Cornish Worthies Volume 1 Walter Hawken Tregellas

ISBN: 9781230410838

Published: September 12th 2013

Paperback

94 pages


Description

Cornish Worthies Volume 1  by  Walter Hawken Tregellas

Cornish Worthies Volume 1 by Walter Hawken Tregellas
September 12th 2013 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, ZIP | 94 pages | ISBN: 9781230410838 | 4.37 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ... wooded, and theMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text.

Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ... wooded, and the churches of St. Columb and Mawgan, which retain many features of interest, are both identified with the famous family whose story we are about to consider.

And here it should be premised that, besides the Arundells of Lanherne, Trerice, Tolverne, and Wardour, there were the Arundells of Menadarva, who afterwards settled at Trengwainton, near Penzance, descended from a Camborne stock, founded by a natural son of an Arundell of Trerice, who intermarried with Pendarves and St. Aubyn. And again, the Arundells of Trevithick, in St.

Columb Major, were a younger branch of the Lanherne family. They settled there circa, Edward VI., and became extinct in 1740. Of the first three branches I propose to treat under the heads of Lanherne, Trerice, and Tolverne- and to conclude my observations with a short reference to one or two minor branches of the family. There can be no doubt, although Hals, with his usual ingenuity (and it might also be said, I fear, with his usual inaccuracy), has endeavoured to find a Cornish etymology for the name, that the name of Arundell is of French origin.

At any rate, such was the belief in the early part of the thirteenth century- for they bore swallows in their escutcheon at least as early as the days of Henry II.- Mr. H. S. Stokes has written a pleasant descriptive poem on The Vale of Lanherne, illustrated by numerous excellent lithographic views after one of our best Cornish landscape-painters, J.

G. Philp. and in the Philippeis, a work composed by Philip le Breton in 1230, there are the following verses descriptive of an encounter between an Arundell and one William de Barr: Vidit Hirundela velocior alite qua- dat Hoc Agnomen ei, fert cujus in aegide signum Se rapit agminibus mediis..



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